Ports & Ships Maritime News

Mar 23, 2009
Author: Terry Hutson









PROVIDING INFORMATION TO THE MARITIME INDUSTRY
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SEND YOUR NEWS AND PRESS RELEASES TO
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TODAY’S BULLETIN OF MARITIME NEWS

Click on headline to go direct to story – use the BACK key to return

  • First View – USS HARTFORD

  • Another nuclear sub collision causes spill

  • SADC to consider sanctions on Madagascar

  • Hoppers go hi-tech

  • NSRI in dash to save trawler from sinking

  • Piracy report – Greek ship captured

  • Pic of the day –THE EXPLORER




    Looking for help? Try our MARITIME SERVICES DIRECTORY CLICK HERE


    First View – USS HARTFORD



    Damage to the US Navy nuclear-powered submarine USS HARTFORD (SSN 768) is clearly visible in this picture released by the US Navy of the boat arriving at the Mina Salman pier in Port Bahrain. See next news report for details. Picture US Navy



    Another nuclear sub collision causes spill

    In the latest incident involving a US Navy nuclear powered submarine, the Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS HARTFORD (SSN768) has been in a collision with the amphibious warfare ship USS NEW ORLEANS (LPD18) in the Strait of Hormuz.

    The accident took place at 1am local time on Friday (20 March 2009) and left 15 sailors on the submarine ‘slightly injured’ while 25,000 gallons of diesel bunker fuel has leaked from a ruptured fuel tank on the USS New Orleans.

    Both ships were able to return to Port Bahrain under their own power for damage assessment and evaluation. Damage to the submarine appeared to be quite severe to the sail area. The US Navy said the propulsion plant in the submarine was not affected by the collision.

    Details of how the collision occurred have not been released but an official investigation has been initiated. Photographs released by the navy show extensive damage to the submarine’s sail which suggests she was running submerged at the time of the collision.

    USS Hartford is one of 50 Los Angeles class attack submarines, which displaces 6,900 tons submerged and is propelled by a S6G nuclear reactor feeding steam turbines. The ship carries a crew of around 140 personnel and is armed with torpedoes and Tomahawk missiles. She was commissioned in 1994.

    USS New Orleans is a San Antonio-class loading dock ship of a new class and was commissioned in 2005. She displaces 25,300 tons fully loaded and is built to a stealth design. She has a crew of over 400 and can carry 760 troops.

    Both ships are based with the US 5th Fleet in the Persian Gulf and Arabian Sea area.


    Picture US Navy



    SADC to consider sanctions on Madagascar

    by Edwin Tshivhidzo (BuaNews)

    Pretoria, 21 March - Imposing tough sanctions on Madagascar will be top of the agenda when the Southern African Development Community (SADC) meets in Johannesburg at the end of the month.

    It is time tougher action is taken against those who illegally oust democratically elected leaders, said South African Defence Minister Charles Nqakula, briefing reporters in Pretoria on the outcomes of the SADC Extra Ordinary Summit of the Organ Troika on Politics, Defence and Security Cooperation in Swaziland.

    Madagascan President Marc Ravalomanana handed power to a navy admiral earlier this week after a violent power struggle. The army in turn named opposition leader Andry Rajoelina the country's new leader.

    The Troika will submit to SADC a number of resolutions, including imposing sanctions and using all relevant resources available to restore order in Madagascar.

    Mr Nqakula said the mood at the summit had been characterised by a deep sense of intolerance to the illegal outage of a democratically elected leader.

    “The sanctions must send a clear signal that SADC does not tolerate any ousting of democratically elected leaders. They must feel the sanctions.”

    He further said that the Madagascan situation is to be used as a yard stick to see how SADC and the African Union respond to situations like this in the future.

    Minister Nqakula further explained that the sanctions would be mainly to put pressure on those that in power illegally and not the ordinary citizens.

    President Kgalema Motlanthe has been briefed by the minister on the summit's outcomes. He had earlier this week said South Africa and the SADC would not recognise Mr Rajoelina as a president.

    He said President Motlanthe, who is also the current SADC Chairperson, might consider holding the SADC Summit earlier as this was a matter he wanted dealt with quickly.

    Executive Secretary of SADC Tomaz Salamao has been mandated to engage the AU, United Nations and all other role players to help define a comprehensive and coherent strategy that would lead to the resolution of the situation in that country.


    * Some readers may wish to compare South Africa and SADC’s swift response to the Madagascan crisis with the lack of response and inertia to another ongoing political drama taking place in Zimbabwe, in which a democratically elected opposition has been denied the reigns of power largely as a result of SADC and South Africa in particular taking no action nor giving recognition to the choice of Zimbabwe’s electorate – Editor



    Hoppers go hi-tech

    Durban-based Arlona Engineering, specialists in the design and manufacture of bulk handling and lifting equipment, has upgraded the design of its hoppers for improved efficiencies, energy savings, enhanced safety and environmental protection.

    “Arlona’s new fourth generation hoppers, perfect for handling materials like fertilisers, soya, cereals, mill scale and coal, are designed to prevent spillage at the transfer point between the ship and the road or rail transport system,” says Steve Christy, managing director of Arlona Engineering. “These new hoppers are now fitted with generators and three hoppers linked together can operate efficiently with one generator.

    “Other new features include a lower headroom design that allows efficient discharge of materials and a folding access platform for easy maintenance. For improved environmental protection, sheeting on the sides of these hoppers prevents wind from blowing the product. A new simple, yet effective red and green light signalling system, with an audible alarm, has improved communication between the crane operator and truck driver, which is critical for safety on site.”

    Arlona has also improved night operation efficiencies by installing tube lights around the rim of each hopper. Different coloured lights clearly define the target area to ensure the correct product is loaded into the right hopper.

    Arlona Engineering enhances its national fabrication, machining and maintenance service with a specialised proofloading facility for lifting equipment. The company is registered as a ‘Lifting Machinery Entity’ (LME) and has a commitment to optimum safety and quality standards and procedures as set out by the Engineering Council of South Africa (ECSA).

    Arlona’s proofloading division, equipped with a sophisticated test rig that is certified to proofload up to 100 tons, is geared to test and certify any lifting equipment.




    Arlona Engineering’s fourth generation hoppers have been manufactured for Bidfreight Port Operations (BPO) for use at Durban Harbour. The company offers a design and manufacturing service to diverse industries throughout Southern Africa.



    NSRI in dash to save trawler from sinking

    March hasn’t been a particularly good month for fishing trawlers. The Cape-based trawler MONIE MARINE sank near Port Elizabeth after coming into collision with the Chinese bulker MARITIME MASTER - see that news report HERE

    This weekend another trawler was in difficulties, this time off the Hout Bay coast in the Western Cape. Brad Geyser, NSRI Hout Bay station commander reports:

    “At 16h24 NSRI Hout Bay, NSRI Kommetjie and NSRI Simonstown were activated following a distress VHF radio message, intercepted by Maritime Radio Services, from the 16 metre fishing trawler AMBER ROSE reporting to be taking water 20 nautical miles South of Cape Point with a crew of 12 on-board in 1.5 metre swells and a 20 knot South Easterly wind.

    “NSRI Hout Bay launched MTU Nadine Gordimer and Albie Matthews and NSRI Simonstown launched Spirit of Safmarine III, all carrying water pumps to be taken to the trawler. NSRI Kommetjie launched Spirit of Winelands to rendezvous with NSRI Hout Bay's rescue craft as they sailed passed Kommetjie to deliver a third water pump to be taken out to the casualty vessel.

    “Fishing trawlers and private boats that were in the area at the time responded to the distress call.

    “The private boat Free Spirit, a Simonstown craft, arrived on-scene first and transferred her water pump on-board to assist with extricating water from the casualty craft and she stood by on-scene to take crew of the casualty vessel over (if necessary) pending the arrival of the NSRI rescue craft.

    “Fearing that the casualty vessel may overflow with water and in case the crew needed to abandon ship the Transnet National Ports Authority placed an SA Air Force 35 Squadron Dakota fixed wing aircraft on alert to deliver and drop (at the casualty vessel) extra life-rafts if necessary. All rescue craft arrived on-scene in time to prevent the call to abandon ship!

    “On arrival on-scene NSRI rescuers were put aboard the trawler and the extra water pumps delivered by the NSRI were set in motion. An NSRI Engineer assessed the damage which appears to be a gaping hole in the port side behind midships. What caused the damage will form part of an investigation by the South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA).

    “The trawler was initially able to be escorted under her own engine power towards the closest harbour, Hout Bay, but during the escort she suffered mechanical failure and the vessel was taken under tow by our rescue craft MTU Nadine Gordimer.

    “NSRI Kommetjie launched Spirit of Winelands again at 21h26 to respond to assist NSRI Hout Bay's rescue craft to bring the casualty vessel to mooring in Hout Bay harbour.

    “The casualty vessel was able to steer to a mooring under her own power once in the shelter of Hout Bay harbour and was safely moored at 22h50. No injuries to any of her crew were sustained.

    “The casualty vessel will be kept afloat during the night with the use of water pumps and the owners are arranging salvage efforts to prevent the inflow of water and to begin repairs.”



    Piracy report – Greek ship captured

    Somali pirates struck again on Friday when they seized the Greek bulk ship TITAN (24,843-gt, 43,214-DWT, built 1983) which was sailing in a security corridor but without escort.

    The ship, which is managed by Albamar Shipping flies the St Vincent & Grenadines flag and was en route from Sevastopol to Busan in South Korea with a cargo of steel. She has a crew of 24 on board, made up mostly of Filipinos although there are other nationalities on board including a Greek master.

    The ship was taken by six pirates armed with AK47 automatic rifles and pistols who used a speedboat to gain access to the ship. Titan is reported to be on the way to a Somali anchorage.

    Meanwhile the US Navy reports that the guided missile cruise USS GETTYSBURG (CG 64) has captured six suspected pirates in the Gulf of Aden after responding to a distress signal from two merchant ships.

    One of the ships, the Philippines-registered BISON EXPRESS issued a call for help after coming under attack from a skiff manned by six heavily-armed pirates. The US ships closed in on the location and despatched a SH-60B helicopter on patrol, which overflew the skiff and observed the men on board hastily throwing objects overboard. The US warship later apprehended the skiff and took the men into custody but released them on account of having no evidence of arms or weapons or other equipment used in acts of piracy.

    A second attack involved the motor vessel SEA GREEN which fired several flares at an approaching suspected pirate boat and managed to ward of the attack.



    Pic of the day – THE EXPLORER




    In November 2008 we reported on the conversion of the Afri-Can Marine Minerals Corporation diamond sampling vessel THE EXPLORER which was at that stage being readied to sail from Singapore for Cape Town. The specialist ship has since arrived and taken up her berth in Cape Town while final fitting out is completed.

    Swedish readers have requested a picture of the ship in Cape Town which Cape Town reader and keen ship photographer Aad Noorland has kindly obliged. Details of the ship and its conversion can be found HERE

    Picture of The Explorer is by Aad Noorland.



    Don’t forget to send us your news and press releases for inclusion in the News Bulletins. Shipping related pictures submitted by readers are always welcome – please email to info@ports.co.za

    Did you know that Ports & Ships lists ship movements for all southern African ports between Walvis Bay on the West Coast and Mombasa on the East Coast?

    TABLE BAY UNDERWAY SHIPPING
    SHIP PHOTOGRAPHERS
    Colour photographs and slides for sale of a variety of ships.

    Thousands of items listed featuring famous passenger liners of the past to cruise ships of today, freighters, container vessels, tankers, bulkers, naval and research vessels.


    P O BOX 809, CAPE TOWN, 8000, SOUTH AFRICA
    snai@worldonline.co.za
    http://home.worldonline.co.za/~snai




    South Africa’s most comprehensive Directory of Maritime Services is now listed on this site. Please check if your company is included. To sign up for a free listing contact info@ports.co.za or register online






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    Ports & Ships Maritime News


    Ports & Ships Maritime News

    Mar 23, 2009
    Author: Terry Hutson














    PROVIDING INFORMATION TO THE MARITIME INDUSTRY
    Reach out to this dedicated maritime audience by advertising here with your Banner - contact info@ports.co.za

    SEND YOUR NEWS AND PRESS RELEASES TO
    info@ports.co.za


    TODAY’S BULLETIN OF MARITIME NEWS

    Click on headline to go direct to story – use the BACK key to return

  • First View – USS HARTFORD

  • Another nuclear sub collision causes spill

  • SADC to consider sanctions on Madagascar

  • Hoppers go hi-tech

  • NSRI in dash to save trawler from sinking

  • Piracy report – Greek ship captured

  • Pic of the day –THE EXPLORER




    Looking for help? Try our MARITIME SERVICES DIRECTORY CLICK HERE


    First View – USS HARTFORD



    Damage to the US Navy nuclear-powered submarine USS HARTFORD (SSN 768) is clearly visible in this picture released by the US Navy of the boat arriving at the Mina Salman pier in Port Bahrain. See next news report for details. Picture US Navy



    Another nuclear sub collision causes spill

    In the latest incident involving a US Navy nuclear powered submarine, the Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS HARTFORD (SSN768) has been in a collision with the amphibious warfare ship USS NEW ORLEANS (LPD18) in the Strait of Hormuz.

    The accident took place at 1am local time on Friday (20 March 2009) and left 15 sailors on the submarine ‘slightly injured’ while 25,000 gallons of diesel bunker fuel has leaked from a ruptured fuel tank on the USS New Orleans.

    Both ships were able to return to Port Bahrain under their own power for damage assessment and evaluation. Damage to the submarine appeared to be quite severe to the sail area. The US Navy said the propulsion plant in the submarine was not affected by the collision.

    Details of how the collision occurred have not been released but an official investigation has been initiated. Photographs released by the navy show extensive damage to the submarine’s sail which suggests she was running submerged at the time of the collision.

    USS Hartford is one of 50 Los Angeles class attack submarines, which displaces 6,900 tons submerged and is propelled by a S6G nuclear reactor feeding steam turbines. The ship carries a crew of around 140 personnel and is armed with torpedoes and Tomahawk missiles. She was commissioned in 1994.

    USS New Orleans is a San Antonio-class loading dock ship of a new class and was commissioned in 2005. She displaces 25,300 tons fully loaded and is built to a stealth design. She has a crew of over 400 and can carry 760 troops.

    Both ships are based with the US 5th Fleet in the Persian Gulf and Arabian Sea area.


    Picture US Navy



    SADC to consider sanctions on Madagascar

    by Edwin Tshivhidzo (BuaNews)

    Pretoria, 21 March - Imposing tough sanctions on Madagascar will be top of the agenda when the Southern African Development Community (SADC) meets in Johannesburg at the end of the month.

    It is time tougher action is taken against those who illegally oust democratically elected leaders, said South African Defence Minister Charles Nqakula, briefing reporters in Pretoria on the outcomes of the SADC Extra Ordinary Summit of the Organ Troika on Politics, Defence and Security Cooperation in Swaziland.

    Madagascan President Marc Ravalomanana handed power to a navy admiral earlier this week after a violent power struggle. The army in turn named opposition leader Andry Rajoelina the country's new leader.

    The Troika will submit to SADC a number of resolutions, including imposing sanctions and using all relevant resources available to restore order in Madagascar.

    Mr Nqakula said the mood at the summit had been characterised by a deep sense of intolerance to the illegal outage of a democratically elected leader.

    “The sanctions must send a clear signal that SADC does not tolerate any ousting of democratically elected leaders. They must feel the sanctions.”

    He further said that the Madagascan situation is to be used as a yard stick to see how SADC and the African Union respond to situations like this in the future.

    Minister Nqakula further explained that the sanctions would be mainly to put pressure on those that in power illegally and not the ordinary citizens.

    President Kgalema Motlanthe has been briefed by the minister on the summit's outcomes. He had earlier this week said South Africa and the SADC would not recognise Mr Rajoelina as a president.

    He said President Motlanthe, who is also the current SADC Chairperson, might consider holding the SADC Summit earlier as this was a matter he wanted dealt with quickly.

    Executive Secretary of SADC Tomaz Salamao has been mandated to engage the AU, United Nations and all other role players to help define a comprehensive and coherent strategy that would lead to the resolution of the situation in that country.


    * Some readers may wish to compare South Africa and SADC’s swift response to the Madagascan crisis with the lack of response and inertia to another ongoing political drama taking place in Zimbabwe, in which a democratically elected opposition has been denied the reigns of power largely as a result of SADC and South Africa in particular taking no action nor giving recognition to the choice of Zimbabwe’s electorate – Editor



    Hoppers go hi-tech

    Durban-based Arlona Engineering, specialists in the design and manufacture of bulk handling and lifting equipment, has upgraded the design of its hoppers for improved efficiencies, energy savings, enhanced safety and environmental protection.

    “Arlona’s new fourth generation hoppers, perfect for handling materials like fertilisers, soya, cereals, mill scale and coal, are designed to prevent spillage at the transfer point between the ship and the road or rail transport system,” says Steve Christy, managing director of Arlona Engineering. “These new hoppers are now fitted with generators and three hoppers linked together can operate efficiently with one generator.

    “Other new features include a lower headroom design that allows efficient discharge of materials and a folding access platform for easy maintenance. For improved environmental protection, sheeting on the sides of these hoppers prevents wind from blowing the product. A new simple, yet effective red and green light signalling system, with an audible alarm, has improved communication between the crane operator and truck driver, which is critical for safety on site.”

    Arlona has also improved night operation efficiencies by installing tube lights around the rim of each hopper. Different coloured lights clearly define the target area to ensure the correct product is loaded into the right hopper.

    Arlona Engineering enhances its national fabrication, machining and maintenance service with a specialised proofloading facility for lifting equipment. The company is registered as a ‘Lifting Machinery Entity’ (LME) and has a commitment to optimum safety and quality standards and procedures as set out by the Engineering Council of South Africa (ECSA).

    Arlona’s proofloading division, equipped with a sophisticated test rig that is certified to proofload up to 100 tons, is geared to test and certify any lifting equipment.




    Arlona Engineering’s fourth generation hoppers have been manufactured for Bidfreight Port Operations (BPO) for use at Durban Harbour. The company offers a design and manufacturing service to diverse industries throughout Southern Africa.



    NSRI in dash to save trawler from sinking

    March hasn’t been a particularly good month for fishing trawlers. The Cape-based trawler MONIE MARINE sank near Port Elizabeth after coming into collision with the Chinese bulker MARITIME MASTER - see that news report HERE

    This weekend another trawler was in difficulties, this time off the Hout Bay coast in the Western Cape. Brad Geyser, NSRI Hout Bay station commander reports:

    “At 16h24 NSRI Hout Bay, NSRI Kommetjie and NSRI Simonstown were activated following a distress VHF radio message, intercepted by Maritime Radio Services, from the 16 metre fishing trawler AMBER ROSE reporting to be taking water 20 nautical miles South of Cape Point with a crew of 12 on-board in 1.5 metre swells and a 20 knot South Easterly wind.

    “NSRI Hout Bay launched MTU Nadine Gordimer and Albie Matthews and NSRI Simonstown launched Spirit of Safmarine III, all carrying water pumps to be taken to the trawler. NSRI Kommetjie launched Spirit of Winelands to rendezvous with NSRI Hout Bay's rescue craft as they sailed passed Kommetjie to deliver a third water pump to be taken out to the casualty vessel.

    “Fishing trawlers and private boats that were in the area at the time responded to the distress call.

    “The private boat Free Spirit, a Simonstown craft, arrived on-scene first and transferred her water pump on-board to assist with extricating water from the casualty craft and she stood by on-scene to take crew of the casualty vessel over (if necessary) pending the arrival of the NSRI rescue craft.

    “Fearing that the casualty vessel may overflow with water and in case the crew needed to abandon ship the Transnet National Ports Authority placed an SA Air Force 35 Squadron Dakota fixed wing aircraft on alert to deliver and drop (at the casualty vessel) extra life-rafts if necessary. All rescue craft arrived on-scene in time to prevent the call to abandon ship!

    “On arrival on-scene NSRI rescuers were put aboard the trawler and the extra water pumps delivered by the NSRI were set in motion. An NSRI Engineer assessed the damage which appears to be a gaping hole in the port side behind midships. What caused the damage will form part of an investigation by the South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA).

    “The trawler was initially able to be escorted under her own engine power towards the closest harbour, Hout Bay, but during the escort she suffered mechanical failure and the vessel was taken under tow by our rescue craft MTU Nadine Gordimer.

    “NSRI Kommetjie launched Spirit of Winelands again at 21h26 to respond to assist NSRI Hout Bay's rescue craft to bring the casualty vessel to mooring in Hout Bay harbour.

    “The casualty vessel was able to steer to a mooring under her own power once in the shelter of Hout Bay harbour and was safely moored at 22h50. No injuries to any of her crew were sustained.

    “The casualty vessel will be kept afloat during the night with the use of water pumps and the owners are arranging salvage efforts to prevent the inflow of water and to begin repairs.”



    Piracy report – Greek ship captured

    Somali pirates struck again on Friday when they seized the Greek bulk ship TITAN (24,843-gt, 43,214-DWT, built 1983) which was sailing in a security corridor but without escort.

    The ship, which is managed by Albamar Shipping flies the St Vincent & Grenadines flag and was en route from Sevastopol to Busan in South Korea with a cargo of steel. She has a crew of 24 on board, made up mostly of Filipinos although there are other nationalities on board including a Greek master.

    The ship was taken by six pirates armed with AK47 automatic rifles and pistols who used a speedboat to gain access to the ship. Titan is reported to be on the way to a Somali anchorage.

    Meanwhile the US Navy reports that the guided missile cruise USS GETTYSBURG (CG 64) has captured six suspected pirates in the Gulf of Aden after responding to a distress signal from two merchant ships.

    One of the ships, the Philippines-registered BISON EXPRESS issued a call for help after coming under attack from a skiff manned by six heavily-armed pirates. The US ships closed in on the location and despatched a SH-60B helicopter on patrol, which overflew the skiff and observed the men on board hastily throwing objects overboard. The US warship later apprehended the skiff and took the men into custody but released them on account of having no evidence of arms or weapons or other equipment used in acts of piracy.

    A second attack involved the motor vessel SEA GREEN which fired several flares at an approaching suspected pirate boat and managed to ward of the attack.



    Pic of the day – THE EXPLORER




    In November 2008 we reported on the conversion of the Afri-Can Marine Minerals Corporation diamond sampling vessel THE EXPLORER which was at that stage being readied to sail from Singapore for Cape Town. The specialist ship has since arrived and taken up her berth in Cape Town while final fitting out is completed.

    Swedish readers have requested a picture of the ship in Cape Town which Cape Town reader and keen ship photographer Aad Noorland has kindly obliged. Details of the ship and its conversion can be found HERE

    Picture of The Explorer is by Aad Noorland.



    Don’t forget to send us your news and press releases for inclusion in the News Bulletins. Shipping related pictures submitted by readers are always welcome – please email to info@ports.co.za

    Did you know that Ports & Ships lists ship movements for all southern African ports between Walvis Bay on the West Coast and Mombasa on the East Coast?

    TABLE BAY UNDERWAY SHIPPING
    SHIP PHOTOGRAPHERS
    Colour photographs and slides for sale of a variety of ships.

    Thousands of items listed featuring famous passenger liners of the past to cruise ships of today, freighters, container vessels, tankers, bulkers, naval and research vessels.


    P O BOX 809, CAPE TOWN, 8000, SOUTH AFRICA
    snai@worldonline.co.za
    http://home.worldonline.co.za/~snai




    South Africa’s most comprehensive Directory of Maritime Services is now listed on this site. Please check if your company is included. To sign up for a free listing contact info@ports.co.za or register online






  • Google

    Web ports.co.za

    Click to go back


      - Contact Us


      - Home